two tone shoes

Our Yellowest Shoes

SebastianFullLocation: L’Arc-en-Ciel, Winterfall

“Jeeves,” I said.

“Sir?” said Jeeves. He had been clearing away the breakfast things, but at the sound of the young master’s voice cheesed it courteously.

“You were absolutely right about the weather. It is a juicy morning.”

“Decidedly, sir.”

“Spring and all that.”

“Yes, sir.”

“In the spring, Jeeves, a livelier iris gleams upon the burnished dove.”

“So I have been informed, sir.”

“Right ho! Then bring me my whangee, my yellowest shoes, and the old green Homburg. I’m going into the Park to do pastoral dances.”

It’s a bit early for pastoral dances in the park, unless one has been where we have been lately. Thoughts of spring intrude in situ, while much of the northern hemisphere is still shoveling snow. But, there we are. 

We’ve often wondered about this “yellow shoe” business that Mr. Wooster refers to in this passage. Was it really a true and unapologetic yellow, or was it what might be termed ‘tan’? A lighter shade of tan that approximates a pale brown that can be read as ‘yellow’, but still not blatantly yellow, if you know what we mean. We’re having a difficult time finding period illustrations or samples of truly yellow shoes, so have to assume that by “yellow,” our Bertie might mean something more like the following:

florsheim20s

1356043283_IMPERIAL_-_Cola_Tan_Polished_Calf_Leather_Mens_Brogue_Shoe

yellowtanshoe

shoesSlider_20

We also imagine these shoes in a perforated spectator style, a fashion that can be found in particularly dandy samples of spring/summer shoes for men in the 1920s and ‘30s. Unlike perforated broguing, these shoes would have had ventilation holes punched clear through a single layer of leather.

Sebastian1[1] The Sebastian shoe in “mustard” with perforated broguing. 

But in the interest of considering the other “yellow” possibilities, here are some additional options:

L&BFull[2] Our favorite brogued Oxford standby from Lapoint & Bastchild in the “cream” color option, which can read as yellow if one squints in the right light…

L&B1…but mostly reads as cream.

HaysurizaFull[3] The best option we’ve found for approximating what we’ve found in the period illustrations, from Haysuriza.

Haysuriza1

Whangee, by the way, is a bamboo grass with woody stems used to make things like canes, umbrella handles, handbag handles, cigarette holders. etc. We do not absolutely know what the “whangee” referred to above might be, but given that canes from whangee are commonly referred to as “whangees,” we’ll make a reasonable guess that Bertie is stepping out with a cane, rather than an umbrella on such a fine spring day. Alas, while there are canes in world, as have not discovered a whangee, specifically. 

chaplintrampMr. Chaplin with his crook-handled whangee, My Love of Old Hollywood

As for a green Homburg, we’d love one, although it might not be the best option for this particular suit. Our brown Homburg would be suitable, but we opted for the jauntier, perhaps a tad flashy, slouched fedora.

Suggested

Shoes [1] ~ Sebastian in mustard

Shoes [2] ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Shoes [3] ~ Haysuriza, Lace & Cap Consul in tan

Suit ~ FATEwear, Norton in “claypit”

Shirt & Tie ~ Hoorenbeek, Real Shirt, with print tie HUD added

Hat ~ Elysium Frankie boy hat, acquired through a past MenStuff Hunt, 

Dressed for [1] L$1915, [2] L$2139, [3] L$1900

Resources Consulted

“Jeeves in the Springtime”

Vintage Shoe Addict

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An Early 1920s Possibility

aphorism1[1] Location ~ Britannia Village: London Ambiguity

Fighting the madding crowd at The Mens Department, we almost didn’t give this suit a second glance. Upon consideration, however, we have determined that it is not a bad option for effecting an early 1920s aesthetic. The jacket could be looser and longer, but, well, there you are.

We do find the tremendous cuffs, though adding an interesting contemporary style element, not quite the thing for our early 20th century sensibilities…

aphorcuffs

…but we will overlook that one issue.

We also find that this suit works fairly well for a Peaky Blinders sort of look, if one wishes to go for that.

peakyaphor[2]

Suggested

Suit ~ Aphorism, Vintage Crew @ TMD

Tie [1] ~ Adjunct, Classic Bowtie, candy stripes

Hat [1] ~ Hyacinthe Luynes, Homburg grey 

Cap [2] ~ Argrace Hunting with “Very short” hair in light brown, color-change cap

Shoes [1] ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Boots [2] ~ Brii, casual military boots, black

Dressed for [1] L$1294 & [2] L$718

Subtle Variations on the Casual Theme

countryhouse_edited-1[1] Location: Goatswood

We have nothing earth-shattering to offer today, but as we were messing about with this and that, here and there, we thought we might go ahead and capture a few photographs exploring just a little more country/casual attire.

We are dressed today in a muted plaid lounge jacket paired with our favorite casual, almost heather-mixture tweed trouser.  Two variations of waistcoat, shirt, tie and shoe are considered.

Let us discuss for a moment shoes. Again. A stout Oxford or derby shoe with brogued toe cap — pointed or not, two-toned or not — would have been a standard, but Mr. Wooster grows a little tired of them when worn all the time. As an alternative, he is experimenting with a rather festive saddle shoe in the second illustration. Saddle shoes started life as sporting shoes — particularly for golf — but by the 1930s were beginning to be coopted by women. Some today consider this a feminine shoe, but we’re satisfied with its inherent masculinity.

treesbase_edited-2[2] Location: Neva River

Mr. Wooster’s valet finds these shoes far too loud, alarming even, with the vivid combination of merlot and black, but Bertie is in full rebellion at the moment and will bally well wear them when and if he wants. 

Suggested

Jacket ~ Kauna XIV, Plaid Earth

Shirt [1] ~ Kauna XIV in white

Tie [1] ~ Adjunct, Classic Bow Tie, plaids collection

Shirt [2] ~ Hoorenbeek, Real Shirt with colour change HUD

Tie [2] ~ Hoorenbeek, mesh printed HUD

Waistcoat [1] ~ Kauna XIV in plain rust knit

Waistcoat [2] ~ Kauna XIV in black

Trousers ~ Bastard, herringbone tweed casual baggy

Shoes [1] ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Shoes [2] ~ Lindy, Parker in black/merlot

Hat [1] ~ Quedra HD Design, free brown mesh fedora, tinted as desired

Glasses [1] ~ Body Factory, Antique Glasses, group gift

Mustache [1] ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Hair [2] ~ Action James (includes color change HUD and a plethora of color options)

Dressed for L$1756 & L$2054, respectively

Resources Consulted

Vintage Dancer — Saddle Shoes Through the Decades

Jazz Age Flamboyance Considered

Flamboyant1Location: Timeless Memories [1]

We are great admirers of the goods purveyed by Deco, although they tend to be designed for a more adventuresome set, whether in terms of action or dress. This “duster” style coat (so called by the designers, but really more of a Guards coat or paletot) and ensemble, for example, is not something Mr. Wooster’s valet would stick for long at any price. Within two shakes of a duck’s tail — dare we say, perhaps even within but a single shake of said bird’s posterior plumage — this ripe item would have been spirited away to an East End consignment shop, where it no doubt would fall into the glad hands of an up and coming man of business in the underground economy. It is rather more “Nucky” Johnson, upon whom Mr. Buscemi’s character, Nucky Thompson in Boardwalk Empire is based, or even the extraordinarily flamboyant Chalky White character in same program, than Bertram Wilberforce Wooster. But if that is your ‘thing’, as they say, by all means, dash it, take it for a stroll ’round the square.

Flamboyance is something that Mr. Wooster attempts from time-to-time, never with any great success. Either he gives the juicy article of clothing a rational second thought once he catches a glimpse of himself in the mirror, or his valet compels him to see reason. If the episode of the white mess dinner jacket acquired at Cannes is anything to go by, we rather doubt this “duster” will even make it through the threshold of Mr. Wooster’s flat. The white mess dinner jacket, after all, was in comparison quite restrained. 

This reminds us — we must find a white mess dinner jacket.

Flamboyant2[2]

Suggested

Coat ~ Deco, His Peacemaker leather duster, modeled in brown [1] and red [2], waistcoat/jacket built in

Shirt ~ Hoorenbeek, Real Shirt with colour change HUD

Tie ~ Hoorenbeek, mesh printed HUD

Trousers [1] ~ Bastard, herringbone tweed casual baggy

Trousers [2] ~ Kauna XIV. Tweed Twill Grey (part of full ensemble sold together)

Hat ~ Hyacinthe Luynes, Homburg brown [1] & grey [2] @ SL Marketplace 

Shoes ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Mustache ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Cigarette ~ Sinister Designs, cigarette sculpty v.3, from SL marketplace

Dressed for L$2304 & 2951, respectively

Resources Consulted

Right Ho, Jeeves

The Trench Coat

trench1Location: 1920s Berlin Project

While most fashionable men’s coats in the 1920s were unbelted, double-breasted varieties and generally wool — occasionally fur, if the gentleman were a little on the vulgar side, if rolling in plenty of cabbage — the trench was decidedly a thing. The origins are a little obscure, but it was a standard military style of overcoat by the Boer War, and ubiquitous by the Great War. Pre-Great War tenches were longer, well past the knees, but the hem line moved north on some models during the War, possibly for very practical reasons (less of one’s kit to drag through the mud, don’t you know). We’ve never seen an old photograph or illustration of one quite this short, but this was a free hunt item, and for free, who’s going to complain? It’s close enough for a galloping horse, as they say in theater circles.

About the trousers — we have a bit of a problem here; the fit on these trousers is too narrow and there is no discernible crease. Men’s trousers in that era were fairly wide and the sharp, crisp crease was an important feature of the overall silhouette. It’s too bad, but just as it’s difficult to come by a really good period collar in SL, it’s difficult to get a good crease on one’s trousers. These look like they fell into the hands of Alistair Bingham-Reeves’ valet, an excrescence famous for pressing his employer’s trousers sideways.

Mr. Wooster has a decidedly Trevor Howard-in-The Third Man air about him here, and old Trevor would have only been a boy of about 10 or 11 years old in the mid-1920s. He didn’t come into his recognizable adult own with this look until some years later. The Third Man, as a matter of fact, came out in 1949.

third_callowayTrevor Howard still from The Third Man, 1949, moonboog.com

While a bit of an anachronism in some of the details, this is still a nice look and won’t get you tossed out on your ear from any interwar sim. Mr. Wooster, wandering the snowy streets of Berlin tonight, fits in just fine.

trenchscene1

trenchscene2

 

Suggested

Trenchcoat ~ Jana’s For Men, acquired at a past Menstuff Hunt for free

Trousers ~ Munereia, Carbeseu, former group gift

Shirt ~ Kauna XIV in white

Tie ~ Kauna Tuxedo XIV accessories: Hogwarts collection, Hufflepuff, free at the store

Hat ~ Elysium Frankie boy hat, acquired at a past Menstuff Hunt for free

Shoes ~ Coco, Oxford two-tone, past group gift

Mustache ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Cigarette ~ Sinister Designs, cigarette sculpty v.3, from SL marketplace

Skin ~ Hermony, Leon

Eyes ~ Aveline mesh eyes in hazel, L$0@SL Marketplace 

Dressed for L$369

Resources Consulted

Gentleman’s Gazette — Trench Coat Guide

Jeeves and the Hard-Boiled Egg

Love to Know — Men’s Fashion in the 1920s

 

A country ramble

breeks1Location: Roche

In the last post, we presented this Kauna suit as a suitable option for urban day wear. The purchased package includes a pair of knickerbockers (what they call breeks) that serve well for sporting in the country. Plus fours  — so named because they are four inches longer than standard knee breeches and rather more voluminous — would be even better, being especially authentic to the era, but until some SL designer whiz drafts up a pair of those, these will do.

A word on that little spot of white shirting visible above the beltline — that is a decidedly late 2oth/early 21st century detail. In the first half of the 20th century, men wore their trousers at the natural waist. Few people born past 1970 or so have any idea where the natural waist is. They think it’s in the general region of the belly button or top of hips. No, dear reader; the natural waist is rather north of where people wear their trousers today. So-called “high-waisted” pants today are actually a natural waist fit, with the waistband at the point where the torso notches inward when looking straight on at the human physique. And when your trousers sit at the natural waist, all you would see in any notch at the bottom of your waistcoat is the fabric of the trouser, never the fabric of the shirt. This detail bothers us so much, we were tempted to Photoshop the issue away, but in the interest of truth in advertising, refrained from doing so.

As a side note, even contemporary style mavens suggest that men would look much more polished in their dress if they would like hike those trous up to the waistline.

About that mustache; Mr. Wooster’s man is greatly disturbed by it, and will no doubt endeavor to convince Bertie to remove the bally thing. According to Jeeves, you see, “A man’s character is better displayed through his actions than his attempts at facial hair.” That being said, a tidy mustache a la Ronald Coleman is very appropriate to the era.

colemanoldhollywoodincolor.com

Suggested

Suiting ~ Kauna XIV. Tweed Twill Grey (jacket, tie, breeks and socks worn)

Waistcoat ~ Kauna XIV in Plaid Thistle

Shirt ~ Kauna XIV in white

Hat + Hair ~ Argrace Hunting “Very short” in light brown (hat color can be changed)

Shoes ~ Fir & MNA, Ashford Brogue, grey and charcoal

Mustache ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Skin ~ Hermony, Leon

Eyes ~ Aveline mesh eyes in hazel, L$0@SL Marketplace 

Dressed for L$1775

Resources Consulted

Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit

Sartorialist Lesson #1 — Wear Your Pants On Your Natural Waist, NOT Your Hips