trousers

Peaky Blinders

pinky1Location: Neva Sky Villi

In the interest of appealing to a more economically modest set of characters, Mr. Wooster is today modeling a Peaky Blinders sort of aesthetic. We have not actually seen this television show, but understand that it does for the English underground economy set what Boardwalk Empire did for the American. This program, in contrast, is set in the English Midlands — the Small Heath section of Birmingham, to be exact — in the late teens and early 1920s, and is appropriately grey and gritty and coal-smokey in a way that Boardwalk generally was not. That is what we surmise from stills of the production, in any case. 

peaky-blinders-castPeaky Blinders cast, penny collars, cropped trousers, sturdy boots and all

An article in the Telegraph described in some detail the post-first World War style that marked the era, class and, consequently, the costuming on the program. There are few perfect solutions in world to affecting this look, naturally. The Deadwool penny collar shirt is hindered in its flexibility by not coming in a version that can be easily worn under jackets. The shirting poking out through the jacket fabric on the arms isn’t visible in the above photograph, only because of the way the shot is set up. How difficult would it be for the Deadwool maker to add some chest-only versions of this shirt to be worn under jackets, as Kauna and Hoorenbeek do with theirs? Surely not so very, what?

pinky2Note that the Deadwool shirt has suspenders as part of the graphic, and it is designed to go with a ‘gunslinger’ type trouser with a gun tie on the thigh. Wearing it with this trouser, our favorite at capturing an interwar aesthetic, necessitates a waistcoat. Otherwise, one is captured committing the redundancy of both suspenders and a belt. 

pinky3

Suggested

Jacket ~from the Kauna XIV suit. Tweed Twill Grey

Shirt ~ Deadwool, round collar shirt

Waistcoat ~ Kauna XIV in black

Trousers ~ Bastard, casual baggy in steel

Cap + Hair ~ Argrace Hunting “Very short” in light brown, color-change cap

Tie ~ W Bow Tie, striped fabrics @ SL Marketplace

Boots ~ Brii, casual military boots, black

Dressed for L$1924

Resources Consulted

The Telegraph — Your Winter Wardrobe, Peaky Blinders Style

Thoughts on Casual Wear

TweedyLocation: Frisland

We’ve come to the conclusion today that perhaps the most challenging part of dressing the part is when we wish to dress down. Gentlemen of the early 20th century would wear some variation of the lounge suit on any and all occasions, on any and all days of the week. That said, sportswear came into its own in the interwar period. A man of Mr. Wooster’s class would have his golfing plus fours worn with a jumper and jaunty tam-o-shanter hat; his tennis whites; his cricket whites; his hiking, fishing and shooting kits.

But even if not a particularly sporty chap, a fellow would certainly don on a lazy Saturday spent at home, especially in the country, a comfortable jumper over his shirt and tie, and a relaxed pair of trousers in flannel or tweed, perhaps a gabardine or in the summer, a linen or linen blend. If of the younger, more adventuresome set, he might even wear a pair of Oxford bags, which came onto the scene among the more rebellious students at said school in 1924. Wooster, an Oxford man himself, might consider them, but at the cost of his valet staging a major rebellion of his own. Still, if we found them in world, we’d give them a spin around the flat.

bagsI mean to say, wow!

SL has some reasonable, if imperfect, suiting options and some really rather good evening wear, but casual ensembles appropriate to the era are largely up to the individual to piece together as well as he can. This has its positive aspects, if one enjoys the challenge and exercise of creative juices, but it can also be frustrating. Things don’t always work together so well in world. Pieces get all wobbly when one tries to pile them on top of other pieces. 

tweedy2

We built this look today around the desire to make some kind of use of a free hunt item coat, because, by gad, when we acquire a likely item for free, we want to make decent use of it. We’ve found, however, that we can easily lay out more green cabbage trying to make a free item work than we would purchasing a ready-to-wear ensemble. As our dear old mater used to say, there is no such thing as a free puppy.

Suggested

Shirt ~ Hoorenbeek, Real Shirt with colour change HUD

Tie ~ Hoorenbeek, mesh printed HUD

Knit vest ~ Kauna XIV in plain rust

Trousers ~ Bastard, herringbone tweed casual baggy

Coat ~ Tamiron Forge, Trench Coat in brown, past Men Only Hunt item

Hat ~ Quedra HD Design, free brown mesh fedora, tinted as desired

Shoes ~ Gabriel, wingtip in brown, past group gift

Hair ~ Action James (includes color change HUD and a plethora of color options)

Dress for L$1526, inclusive of hair. It should be noted that one gets a LOT of shirting and tie options for the price with the Hoorenbeek shirts.

Resources Consulted

Fashion Encyclopedia – Modern World 1919-1929

The Double Breasted Blazer

blazer1Location: New Port Yacht Club

Mr. Wooster has been known to oil down to the South of France this time of year, to get away from the more demanding of his aunts as much as the weather. But he also starts to yearn for the lighter, more cheerful raiment that summer brings. To wit, his navy serge, double-breasted blazer with the jolly brass buttons, paired here with white flannel trousers and a Panama hat shaped in the Homburg style. We would prefer a Optimo style of Panama (see our latest wish-list post), but we’ll take what we can get.

We’ve also seen this classic blazer paired with cream-coloured short pants and a jaunty captain’s cap in a fashion illustration from the 1930s. Bow ties and ascots are appropriate neckwear, as well as the tie, but this particular model only comes with a tie. We have found, however, that one can get away with wearing a shirt from another maker rather than the shirt meant for the jacket, in which case one may be able to experiment with other neckwear options, as we’ve done here.

blazer2

Suggested

Blazer ~ Hoorenbeek, Double Breasted in blue

Trousers ~  Just Because, men’s mesh suit slacks, Modern Gatsby Collection in white

Shirt (second photo) ~ Kauna XIV in white

Tie (second photo) ~ W Bow Tie, striped fabrics @ SL Marketplace

Hat ~ Hyacinthe Luynes, Straw Homburg Hat @ SL Marketplace

Shoes ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Cigarette ~ Sinister Designs, cigarette sculpty v.3, from SL marketplace

Skin ~ Hermony, Leon

Eyes ~ Aveline mesh eyes in hazel, L$0@SL Marketplace 

Dressed for L$1459 & L$1808

Mr. Wooster’s wish list

To all the haberdashers and tailors of Second Life, here are a few things that we gents wandering about in the first half of the 20th century would really like to see. We might consider this a running series, as more things come to us.

A tall, spearpoint collar, ideally detachable (in white) to pair with different shirtings, and perhaps even interchangeable with a round point collar, which was the fashion in the first 20 years, and still worn through the 1920s

collar1Darcy Clothing

Ties in fun deco patterns and mid-century graphics, somewhat short and wide-ish — too many skinny ties in world, if you ask us. These may be a bit on the too bold side, but it provides an idea of the general theme. One might consult the tie pictured above with the collar.

decotiesFrom the Dallas Vintage Shop

A high-waisted trouser, particularly one with a crisp crease, and not with a contemporary ‘hipster’ skinny fit. Men wore their trousers high and loose, although a close fit around the ankle — a pegged look — was apparent through much of the 1920s and into the ‘30s in formal wear.

RaftHighwaistedTrousersGeorge Raft, still from Night After Night, 1932

Jackets and sporting coats with a high, pinched-in waist and long cut.

Raft_Full SuitGeorge Raft, again, still from Night After Night, 1932

A Norfolk jacket.

Gelly Tweed Full Norfolk Jacket_jpgBookster Tailoring

Plus-fours. How can we be expected to show our faces on the links without them? Nice and billowy, please.

bobbyjonesBobby Jones

An Optimo-style Panama Hat — note the rolled crease down the center of the crown. What would make this really jolly in SL is to have a changeable colour on hat (white, cream, maybe even to cocoa) and ribbon to maximize styling options.

optimopanamaFrom the Panama Hat Company

A mesh boater with colour-change ribbon, maybe one of those HUD thingummies that allow a number of options, inclusive of stripes.

FredAstaireBoaterMr. Astair in his famous boater

We also wish we had the technical savvy and and artistic chops to create these ourselves, but our attempts would likely be rudimentary, at best, and not even close to our own standards.

The Trench Coat

trench1Location: 1920s Berlin Project

While most fashionable men’s coats in the 1920s were unbelted, double-breasted varieties and generally wool — occasionally fur, if the gentleman were a little on the vulgar side, if rolling in plenty of cabbage — the trench was decidedly a thing. The origins are a little obscure, but it was a standard military style of overcoat by the Boer War, and ubiquitous by the Great War. Pre-Great War tenches were longer, well past the knees, but the hem line moved north on some models during the War, possibly for very practical reasons (less of one’s kit to drag through the mud, don’t you know). We’ve never seen an old photograph or illustration of one quite this short, but this was a free hunt item, and for free, who’s going to complain? It’s close enough for a galloping horse, as they say in theater circles.

About the trousers — we have a bit of a problem here; the fit on these trousers is too narrow and there is no discernible crease. Men’s trousers in that era were fairly wide and the sharp, crisp crease was an important feature of the overall silhouette. It’s too bad, but just as it’s difficult to come by a really good period collar in SL, it’s difficult to get a good crease on one’s trousers. These look like they fell into the hands of Alistair Bingham-Reeves’ valet, an excrescence famous for pressing his employer’s trousers sideways.

Mr. Wooster has a decidedly Trevor Howard-in-The Third Man air about him here, and old Trevor would have only been a boy of about 10 or 11 years old in the mid-1920s. He didn’t come into his recognizable adult own with this look until some years later. The Third Man, as a matter of fact, came out in 1949.

third_callowayTrevor Howard still from The Third Man, 1949, moonboog.com

While a bit of an anachronism in some of the details, this is still a nice look and won’t get you tossed out on your ear from any interwar sim. Mr. Wooster, wandering the snowy streets of Berlin tonight, fits in just fine.

trenchscene1

trenchscene2

 

Suggested

Trenchcoat ~ Jana’s For Men, acquired at a past Menstuff Hunt for free

Trousers ~ Munereia, Carbeseu, former group gift

Shirt ~ Kauna XIV in white

Tie ~ Kauna Tuxedo XIV accessories: Hogwarts collection, Hufflepuff, free at the store

Hat ~ Elysium Frankie boy hat, acquired at a past Menstuff Hunt for free

Shoes ~ Coco, Oxford two-tone, past group gift

Mustache ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Cigarette ~ Sinister Designs, cigarette sculpty v.3, from SL marketplace

Skin ~ Hermony, Leon

Eyes ~ Aveline mesh eyes in hazel, L$0@SL Marketplace 

Dressed for L$369

Resources Consulted

Gentleman’s Gazette — Trench Coat Guide

Jeeves and the Hard-Boiled Egg

Love to Know — Men’s Fashion in the 1920s