plus fours

The Cardigan, Part III — Argyle

cardigan3Location: Caelestium Isle

The argyle pattern, with its diamond lozenges intersected by diagonal lines, is identifiable at least back to some point in the 17th century, and is traditionally associated with the Clan Campbell of Argyll in Scotland. However, it was a Scottish knitwear company, Pringle, that popularized it after the first world war. They came up with their “signature” intarsia argyle pattern, which the eventual Duke of Windsor just loved to pieces, in the 1920s. Mostly associated with something one might wear out on the links (what we would give for a nice, billowy pair of mesh plus fours, we will state once again, because it cannot be overstated), an argyle cardigan is none-the-less an appropriate element for country and casual wear, generally speaking.

Suggested

Cardigan ~ Sey, mesh cardigan in beige argyle

Trousers ~ Bastard, casual baggy in herringbone tweed

Shirt + Tie ~ Hoorenbeek, Real Shirt, print shirt HUD and print tie HUD added

Hair ~ Action James (includes color change HUD and a plethora of color options)

Shoes ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Dressed for L$2686

Resources Consulted

Pringle of Scotland — History

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The Cardigan, Part I

cardigan1Location: Basilique

The cardigan, we’ve been told, really came into its own via the influence of the Prince of Wales. Albert Edward, etc., that would be. Future Edward VII. From his earliest days in his sailor suit, he was quite the trend setter, and many of the styles we take for granted as the norm in the 1920s and beyond were set in motion as standards by that other Bertie.

Bertie, future Ed. Seventh, took to wearing a cardigan on the golf course, we understand. A pair of golfing plus fours would be grand with this, if such a thing existed in world, but perhaps not here in the Lago region of northern Italy where our Bertie, escutcheon of the Woosters, is sojourning for a spot of restorative mid-winter mild climate.

Suggested

Cardigan ~ Fatal, Duover Cardigan in brown

Trousers ~ Asteria MensWear, Broderick pants, brown

Shirt ~ Kauna XIV in white striped

Tie ~ Adjunct, Classic Bow Tie, plaids collection

Cap ~ Argrace Hunting with “Very short” hair in light brown, color-change cap

Boots ~ Hoorenbeek, Ray Ray

Dressed for L$1519

Resources Consulted

Vintage Dancer — History of 1920s Men’s Sweaters, Pullovers, Cardigans

Mr. Wooster’s wish list

To all the haberdashers and tailors of Second Life, here are a few things that we gents wandering about in the first half of the 20th century would really like to see. We might consider this a running series, as more things come to us.

A tall, spearpoint collar, ideally detachable (in white) to pair with different shirtings, and perhaps even interchangeable with a round point collar, which was the fashion in the first 20 years, and still worn through the 1920s

collar1Darcy Clothing

Ties in fun deco patterns and mid-century graphics, somewhat short and wide-ish — too many skinny ties in world, if you ask us. These may be a bit on the too bold side, but it provides an idea of the general theme. One might consult the tie pictured above with the collar.

decotiesFrom the Dallas Vintage Shop

A high-waisted trouser, particularly one with a crisp crease, and not with a contemporary ‘hipster’ skinny fit. Men wore their trousers high and loose, although a close fit around the ankle — a pegged look — was apparent through much of the 1920s and into the ‘30s in formal wear.

RaftHighwaistedTrousersGeorge Raft, still from Night After Night, 1932

Jackets and sporting coats with a high, pinched-in waist and long cut.

Raft_Full SuitGeorge Raft, again, still from Night After Night, 1932

A Norfolk jacket.

Gelly Tweed Full Norfolk Jacket_jpgBookster Tailoring

Plus-fours. How can we be expected to show our faces on the links without them? Nice and billowy, please.

bobbyjonesBobby Jones

An Optimo-style Panama Hat — note the rolled crease down the center of the crown. What would make this really jolly in SL is to have a changeable colour on hat (white, cream, maybe even to cocoa) and ribbon to maximize styling options.

optimopanamaFrom the Panama Hat Company

A mesh boater with colour-change ribbon, maybe one of those HUD thingummies that allow a number of options, inclusive of stripes.

FredAstaireBoaterMr. Astair in his famous boater

We also wish we had the technical savvy and and artistic chops to create these ourselves, but our attempts would likely be rudimentary, at best, and not even close to our own standards.

A country ramble

breeks1Location: Roche

In the last post, we presented this Kauna suit as a suitable option for urban day wear. The purchased package includes a pair of knickerbockers (what they call breeks) that serve well for sporting in the country. Plus fours  — so named because they are four inches longer than standard knee breeches and rather more voluminous — would be even better, being especially authentic to the era, but until some SL designer whiz drafts up a pair of those, these will do.

A word on that little spot of white shirting visible above the beltline — that is a decidedly late 2oth/early 21st century detail. In the first half of the 20th century, men wore their trousers at the natural waist. Few people born past 1970 or so have any idea where the natural waist is. They think it’s in the general region of the belly button or top of hips. No, dear reader; the natural waist is rather north of where people wear their trousers today. So-called “high-waisted” pants today are actually a natural waist fit, with the waistband at the point where the torso notches inward when looking straight on at the human physique. And when your trousers sit at the natural waist, all you would see in any notch at the bottom of your waistcoat is the fabric of the trouser, never the fabric of the shirt. This detail bothers us so much, we were tempted to Photoshop the issue away, but in the interest of truth in advertising, refrained from doing so.

As a side note, even contemporary style mavens suggest that men would look much more polished in their dress if they would like hike those trous up to the waistline.

About that mustache; Mr. Wooster’s man is greatly disturbed by it, and will no doubt endeavor to convince Bertie to remove the bally thing. According to Jeeves, you see, “A man’s character is better displayed through his actions than his attempts at facial hair.” That being said, a tidy mustache a la Ronald Coleman is very appropriate to the era.

colemanoldhollywoodincolor.com

Suggested

Suiting ~ Kauna XIV. Tweed Twill Grey (jacket, tie, breeks and socks worn)

Waistcoat ~ Kauna XIV in Plaid Thistle

Shirt ~ Kauna XIV in white

Hat + Hair ~ Argrace Hunting “Very short” in light brown (hat color can be changed)

Shoes ~ Fir & MNA, Ashford Brogue, grey and charcoal

Mustache ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Skin ~ Hermony, Leon

Eyes ~ Aveline mesh eyes in hazel, L$0@SL Marketplace 

Dressed for L$1775

Resources Consulted

Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit

Sartorialist Lesson #1 — Wear Your Pants On Your Natural Waist, NOT Your Hips