Oxfords

Our Yellowest Shoes

SebastianFullLocation: L’Arc-en-Ciel, Winterfall

“Jeeves,” I said.

“Sir?” said Jeeves. He had been clearing away the breakfast things, but at the sound of the young master’s voice cheesed it courteously.

“You were absolutely right about the weather. It is a juicy morning.”

“Decidedly, sir.”

“Spring and all that.”

“Yes, sir.”

“In the spring, Jeeves, a livelier iris gleams upon the burnished dove.”

“So I have been informed, sir.”

“Right ho! Then bring me my whangee, my yellowest shoes, and the old green Homburg. I’m going into the Park to do pastoral dances.”

It’s a bit early for pastoral dances in the park, unless one has been where we have been lately. Thoughts of spring intrude in situ, while much of the northern hemisphere is still shoveling snow. But, there we are. 

We’ve often wondered about this “yellow shoe” business that Mr. Wooster refers to in this passage. Was it really a true and unapologetic yellow, or was it what might be termed ‘tan’? A lighter shade of tan that approximates a pale brown that can be read as ‘yellow’, but still not blatantly yellow, if you know what we mean. We’re having a difficult time finding period illustrations or samples of truly yellow shoes, so have to assume that by “yellow,” our Bertie might mean something more like the following:

florsheim20s

1356043283_IMPERIAL_-_Cola_Tan_Polished_Calf_Leather_Mens_Brogue_Shoe

yellowtanshoe

shoesSlider_20

We also imagine these shoes in a perforated spectator style, a fashion that can be found in particularly dandy samples of spring/summer shoes for men in the 1920s and ‘30s. Unlike perforated broguing, these shoes would have had ventilation holes punched clear through a single layer of leather.

Sebastian1[1] The Sebastian shoe in “mustard” with perforated broguing. 

But in the interest of considering the other “yellow” possibilities, here are some additional options:

L&BFull[2] Our favorite brogued Oxford standby from Lapoint & Bastchild in the “cream” color option, which can read as yellow if one squints in the right light…

L&B1…but mostly reads as cream.

HaysurizaFull[3] The best option we’ve found for approximating what we’ve found in the period illustrations, from Haysuriza.

Haysuriza1

Whangee, by the way, is a bamboo grass with woody stems used to make things like canes, umbrella handles, handbag handles, cigarette holders. etc. We do not absolutely know what the “whangee” referred to above might be, but given that canes from whangee are commonly referred to as “whangees,” we’ll make a reasonable guess that Bertie is stepping out with a cane, rather than an umbrella on such a fine spring day. Alas, while there are canes in world, as have not discovered a whangee, specifically. 

chaplintrampMr. Chaplin with his crook-handled whangee, My Love of Old Hollywood

As for a green Homburg, we’d love one, although it might not be the best option for this particular suit. Our brown Homburg would be suitable, but we opted for the jauntier, perhaps a tad flashy, slouched fedora.

Suggested

Shoes [1] ~ Sebastian in mustard

Shoes [2] ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Shoes [3] ~ Haysuriza, Lace & Cap Consul in tan

Suit ~ FATEwear, Norton in “claypit”

Shirt & Tie ~ Hoorenbeek, Real Shirt, with print tie HUD added

Hat ~ Elysium Frankie boy hat, acquired through a past MenStuff Hunt, 

Dressed for [1] L$1915, [2] L$2139, [3] L$1900

Resources Consulted

“Jeeves in the Springtime”

Vintage Shoe Addict

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Subtle Variations on the Casual Theme

countryhouse_edited-1[1] Location: Goatswood

We have nothing earth-shattering to offer today, but as we were messing about with this and that, here and there, we thought we might go ahead and capture a few photographs exploring just a little more country/casual attire.

We are dressed today in a muted plaid lounge jacket paired with our favorite casual, almost heather-mixture tweed trouser.  Two variations of waistcoat, shirt, tie and shoe are considered.

Let us discuss for a moment shoes. Again. A stout Oxford or derby shoe with brogued toe cap — pointed or not, two-toned or not — would have been a standard, but Mr. Wooster grows a little tired of them when worn all the time. As an alternative, he is experimenting with a rather festive saddle shoe in the second illustration. Saddle shoes started life as sporting shoes — particularly for golf — but by the 1930s were beginning to be coopted by women. Some today consider this a feminine shoe, but we’re satisfied with its inherent masculinity.

treesbase_edited-2[2] Location: Neva River

Mr. Wooster’s valet finds these shoes far too loud, alarming even, with the vivid combination of merlot and black, but Bertie is in full rebellion at the moment and will bally well wear them when and if he wants. 

Suggested

Jacket ~ Kauna XIV, Plaid Earth

Shirt [1] ~ Kauna XIV in white

Tie [1] ~ Adjunct, Classic Bow Tie, plaids collection

Shirt [2] ~ Hoorenbeek, Real Shirt with colour change HUD

Tie [2] ~ Hoorenbeek, mesh printed HUD

Waistcoat [1] ~ Kauna XIV in plain rust knit

Waistcoat [2] ~ Kauna XIV in black

Trousers ~ Bastard, herringbone tweed casual baggy

Shoes [1] ~ Lapoint & Bastchild wingtip with single and two-tone options (includes HUD)

Shoes [2] ~ Lindy, Parker in black/merlot

Hat [1] ~ Quedra HD Design, free brown mesh fedora, tinted as desired

Glasses [1] ~ Body Factory, Antique Glasses, group gift

Mustache [1] ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Hair [2] ~ Action James (includes color change HUD and a plethora of color options)

Dressed for L$1756 & L$2054, respectively

Resources Consulted

Vintage Dancer — Saddle Shoes Through the Decades

The Stresemann or stroller, more or less

stresemann1Location: Mayfair

Here is our attempt to replicate a classic 1920s stroller, otherwise known in this version as the Stresemann. Put together largely from pieces already in Mr. Wooster’s wardrobe, it’s not a bad approximation, even if it does look a little second-hand like something Mr. Chaplin might wear in one of his films (interesting to note that Chaplin’s ‘Little Tramp’ is dressed in what is is essentially a morning suit, although ill-fitting suggesting it might be a caste-off). A cut-away morning jacket was common until German foreign minister, Gustav Stresemann, trickled into a formal treaty signing event in 1925 clad in a single-breasted black lounge — sans tails — with matching waistcoat and striped trousers. And unto the world is born the Stresemann.

A tie is really a better option than a bow tie, in our estimation, but finding ties that work with jackets in SL can be catch as catch can, usually involving pieces that are specifically made to work with each other. But bow ties are not unsuitable. One in a jolly polka dot might be especially recommended.

A soft-collared shirt came into vogue at this point, but didn’t altogether replace the stiff wing collar. The former works better than the latter if trying to effect the more relaxed Stresemann style, however. One can take some liberties with shirt colour. We’ve seen illustrations with a blue stripe or a solid soft colour, such as dove grey or peach, in the tunic shirt. A buff-coloured waistcoat would be nice. The houndstooth or glencheck trousers are appropriate to the look, and may feel a little more relaxed than a striped sponge bag trouser. The cuff on the trouser would not be appropriate for more formal occasions and worn with a morning coat, but is acceptable with a stroller and when generally wanting to effect a less rigidly formal appearance, say, when attending the races. We might prefer a double-breasted jacket (known as a reefer) over the single-breasted lounge, but we’ll leave that for further experimentations.

We’ve seen the chamois yellow gloves in fashion illustrations of the era (black is unsuitable for daywear), and will repeat our profound desire for a Homburg to bung on top of this ensemble. Bowlers are considered suitable, however, and it or a relation of the Homburg called an “Eden,” are traditionally considered suitable to the costume. The latter looks close enough to a modest-brimmed fedora to make the hat choice depicted here not unreasonable, if somewhat imperfect. Imperfect though it may be, Mr. Wooster does not care to don his bowler much; the style evokes for him stuffed-bird old boys on the one hand, and energetic, loud New York roughnecked chappies on the other (to say nothing of ladies of the Bolivian highlands). The bowler is a schizophrenic hat.

stresemann2 copyWith bowler

Mr. Wooster took some decided sartorial liberties recently by completing the ensemble with two-toned Oxfords, but we’ve repaired that grave error in judgement with some cap-toed Oxfords in black. We like the idea of Balmoral or button boots, and spats would not be out of place, but avoid a Derby shoe with its open lacing system.

stresemann3Quarter and vamp construction on a true Oxford

  notoxford

Quarter and vamp construction on a Derby — note that the makers of this shoe (Pixelfashion) otherwise produced something really nice that would serve perfectly as a narrow-silhouetted Oxford of the era, if only they had put a proper closed lacing system on it. 

Overall, Bertie’s look is appropriate to rather more relaxed formal daywear occasions than the cut-away morning costume would be. The tuxedo is an evening garment, just to be clear; one would not wear a tuxedo to formal or semi-formal day events, and certainly not to the races, not even Ascot.

strollerandcutawaycopy1vbLet’s just say Mr. Wooster is trying to pull off the costume on the left.

Suggested

Jacket & Shirt ~ Bravura formal black suit, currently a group Christmas gift

Waistcoat ~ Kauna XIV in black

Tie ~ W Bow Tie, striped fabrics @ SL Marketplace

Pants ~ Bastard, Houndstooth “Casual Baggys”

Shoes ~ Haysuriza, Lace & Cap Consul [Shown but not worn: Pixelfashion “Oxford” shoes in black]

Hat ~ Couture Chapeau “Essex” lenin fedora, charcoal + Classic Derby in black

Gloves ~ Female Cosplay system gloves, colour changed

Mustache ~ Fe Style, 6ED in brown

Cigarette ~ Sinister Designs, cigarette sculpty v.3, from SL marketplace

Skin ~ Hermony, Leon

Eyes ~ Aveline mesh eyes in hazel, L$0@SL Marketplace 

Dressed for L$1088

Resources Consulted

Gentleman’s Gazette — The Difference Between Derby & Oxford

Gentleman’s Gazette — The Stresemann

Morning Dress Guide