Norfolk jacket

Mr. Wooster’s wish list

To all the haberdashers and tailors of Second Life, here are a few things that we gents wandering about in the first half of the 20th century would really like to see. We might consider this a running series, as more things come to us.

A tall, spearpoint collar, ideally detachable (in white) to pair with different shirtings, and perhaps even interchangeable with a round point collar, which was the fashion in the first 20 years, and still worn through the 1920s

collar1Darcy Clothing

Ties in fun deco patterns and mid-century graphics, somewhat short and wide-ish — too many skinny ties in world, if you ask us. These may be a bit on the too bold side, but it provides an idea of the general theme. One might consult the tie pictured above with the collar.

decotiesFrom the Dallas Vintage Shop

A high-waisted trouser, particularly one with a crisp crease, and not with a contemporary ‘hipster’ skinny fit. Men wore their trousers high and loose, although a close fit around the ankle — a pegged look — was apparent through much of the 1920s and into the ‘30s in formal wear.

RaftHighwaistedTrousersGeorge Raft, still from Night After Night, 1932

Jackets and sporting coats with a high, pinched-in waist and long cut.

Raft_Full SuitGeorge Raft, again, still from Night After Night, 1932

A Norfolk jacket.

Gelly Tweed Full Norfolk Jacket_jpgBookster Tailoring

Plus-fours. How can we be expected to show our faces on the links without them? Nice and billowy, please.

bobbyjonesBobby Jones

An Optimo-style Panama Hat — note the rolled crease down the center of the crown. What would make this really jolly in SL is to have a changeable colour on hat (white, cream, maybe even to cocoa) and ribbon to maximize styling options.

optimopanamaFrom the Panama Hat Company

A mesh boater with colour-change ribbon, maybe one of those HUD thingummies that allow a number of options, inclusive of stripes.

FredAstaireBoaterMr. Astair in his famous boater

We also wish we had the technical savvy and and artistic chops to create these ourselves, but our attempts would likely be rudimentary, at best, and not even close to our own standards.

Advertisements